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Artists

David Rosales – Supersmith Inlaid Jewelry

The Supersmith Collection offers a selection of some of the highest-quality Sterling Silver Native American style jewelry available in the Southwest today. Nationally renowned Designer David Rosales is one of the finest contemporary Southwest Designers in the world today and is the founder and co-owner of Supersmiths, Inc. Hailing from Gallup, NM, David has been in the jewelry business since 1984 and started Supersmiths in 1997. Since 1997, David and his partner John Delagdo, have taken the industry by storm with their beautiful jewelry. Gorgeous stone combinations and remarkable settings bring this hand-crafted jewelry to a new level.

His work has been featured all over the country including Caesar's Palace, In-Style Magazine, Cowboy and Indian Magazine, Niche Magazine, Native People Magazine and has been seen on the Alley McBeal Show.

David has “handpicked” many of the talented Navajo and Zuni silver and goldsmiths that create each piece of jewelry by hand. Supersmithstrives to exceed expectations of designs and quality in beautiful, wearable art. All David Rosales jewelry designs can be ordered in any stone color combination listed and/or in 14K gold. Special order pricing will be provided upon request. All pieces are also available in your choices of raised cobble inlay or smooth inlay.

Ray Tracey Designs – Inlaid Jewelry

Ray Tracey is nationally known and respected as one of the most outstanding Native American jewelers. Born and raised on the Navajo reservation in Arizona, Ray began making jewelry at the age of nine; he now has been working professionally as a jeweler since 1977. He has received multiple awards throughout the years.

Ray Tracey Designs – Inlaid Jewelry

Ray is an extremely versatile artist. He not only designs traditional Navajo Old Style jewelry, but remains on the cutting edge of contemporary design, including the incorporation of faceted gemstones. His inlay work is unmistakable with vibrant stones such as Lapis, Corals, and Turquoise into sterling silver and 14K Gold. He also creates one of a kind collection pieces made with materials such as opals, diamond and 14K gold that are unmistakable.

New designs by Ray Tracey have not been seen for several years and we are pleased and proud to be presenting Ray’s new design concept “Native Samurai”. This new line is a result of Ray’s long time admiration of Japanese design and culture. Ray’s new “Native Samurai” line reflects a culmination of inspiration by the richness of his ancestral history, merging cultures and his fashion-forward contemporary insightfulness.

Leo Feeney – Southwestern Jewelry

For over thirty-five years jeweler Leo Feeney has developed his singular style of Southwestern fine jewelry. He has, without doubt, mastered his craft, though this humble master jeweler notes that he will always evolve, improve and fine-tune his skills.

Feeney, the son of a Navy dad, traveled the country as a child, spending most of his childhood in Key West, Florida before graduating high school in Pennsylvania. It was a silversmith teacher at a community college who developed Feeney's interest in making fine jewelry. As the teacher's apprentice Feeney learned to master the techniques that would later serve him well in a life-long career as a successful fine jeweler.

A trip to the Southwest set him on his path, both personal and professional: Feeney met his wife at Havasupai Village deep in the Grand Canyon while both were passing through and the many shops in Flagstaff introduced him to the styles and stones of Southwestern jewelry. The rich history of Native American designs, in particular Zuñi Pueblo jewelry designs, greatly influenced the growth of Feeney's personal style. It is the frequent mixture of opaque, semi-precious and precious stones that creates Feeney's signature style. While turquoise, both blue and green, frequently figures in his intricate cluster designs set in sterling silver, a Leo Feeney piece may be composed of gaspeite, spiny oyster, red coral and/or peridot, garnet, amethyst, citrine, topaz, or any number of other stones.

"I begin at the center and work out," Feeney says, describing his creative process for beginning a new design. "There is such variation in individual stones that when you get them laid out, certain stones are just drawn together. Once you get the right blend of stones to work with, once you determine the size of the design, you can begin the silver work."

Feeney generally builds several of one design at a time, altering the stone combinations, to make the most efficient cuts from his sheets of sterling silver. Every piece is touched with the smallest of fine details. And Feeney works seven days a week (with some breaks to fuel his passion for cars, the artist owns a '53 Cadillac Coupe de Ville), but, by and large, "If I'm home and it's daylight, I'm in the shop," he says – a devotion that goes a long way in explaining the artistry represented in every Leo Feeney piece.

Don Lucas – Southwestern Jewelry

Don Lucas has been designing Southwestern jewelry for over 35 years. Drawing from the rich tradition of Native American art, each piece of handmade jewelry is custom designed by Don Lucas. Our distinctive Southwestern style can be seen in every piece - sterling silver bracelets, turquoise pendants and stunning Southwestern necklaces - just to name a few.

To wear a piece of our southwestern jewelry is to bring to life a melody of traditional craftsmanship and unique design. Don personally selects all materials to bring the brilliant colors of coral, turquoise, amethyst, and other semi-precious stones to each piece of hand-made southwestern jewelry.

GL Miller: Studio GL – Inlaid Jewelry

Originally from Tucson, Arizona, GL resided in numerous areas throughout the United States before his family settled in Albuquerque in 1963. It was in growing up captivated by the various local cultures and art expressions that contributed to his early discovery and love of design. GL's imminent future was born in his youth as he experimented with various forms of creativity.

GL Miller: Studio GL – Inlaid Jewelry

Fueled with natural talent and self-taught skill, GL refined his knowledge of design at the University of Albuquerque and the University of New Mexico, majoring in both commercial and fine arts. Following academic study, his creative integrity flourished as an art director for an advertising agency, a commercial photographer and creative director and design manufacturer of Surrisi Timepieces.

Studio GL, started 1997, is the sequel to GL's artisitc background. The recipient of national and international design awards, GL's passion for the Southwest culture and history has fine-tuned his imaginative jewelry creations. His major interest lies in designing contemporary one-of-a-kind jewelry influenced by ethnic American Indian design and Western geometric patterns. His work is not for people who prefer the familiar or traditional, but rather for those who revel in surprise.

A person of curiosity and ingenuity, GL continually explores new avenues to apply his talents and original ideas in the celebrated union of fine gems and metals. Miller and his highly skilled staff sculpture unique jewelry for the trade as well as provide design consulting to the industry. In addition to stones inlaid in sterling silver, Studio GL's extensive selection includes karat gold and jewelry utilizing colorful inlay combinations and gemstones.

Chuck ‘Winterheart’ Reddick – Native American Reproduction Art

Chuck Reddick passed away on September, 26th 2011 due to heart complications. For many years Chuck was a beloved close friend to us here at Black Arrow, and we miss him dearly. All of the pieces in his collection at Black Arrow are the last of his fabulous artifacts and will now always be a special reminder of the amazing artist and man "Chuck Winterheart Reddick".

Chuck ‘Winterheart’ Reddick – Native American Reproduction Art

Chuck Reddick, who had also created traditional dance regalia for Native Americans, began his artistry path with a car accident in the Dakotas over thirty years ago. He spent his recovery on a Lakota Sioux reservation and it was there he learned the Plains Indian culture and the techniques for making the traditional shirts and other items.

Chuck Reddick meticulously created each piece using only traditional methods and materials. His dyes were from plants and minerals such as red from prickly pear juice, yellow from Mormon tea and purple from sweetgrass. Many of his beads were antique trade beads.

Chuck Reddick had been involved with pre-1840s historical re-enactment of the fur trade era for fifteen years and was a member of one of the oldest black powder clubs in the United States. In 1993, the artist was the first in the nation to organize an authentic powwow/rendezvous with 25 Native Americans and 25 mountain men. Three dance drums and thirty-six singers entertained over 4000 visitors to the encampment of 25 tipis and an authentic mountain-man camp.

Chuck Reddick also brought his unique skills and knowledge to Head Start as a special education teacher, offering demonstrations of living history to over 7,000 students.

Russ Kruse – Native American Reproduction Art

Russ Keck was born in Orange, Texas, and was adopted by the Kruse family when he was three years old. As a child, Russ was introduced to the Native American culture by his uncle, who kept cases full of arrowheads that he'd found on his land and nearby. This sparked his interest in Native American culture and he soon began to create bows and arrows. Seeing his interest in handcrafting objects, his adoptive father, a carpenter, taught him how to work with wood. Russ then taught himself to carve animals out of pieces of Ash, Mesquite, Birch, and Maple trees.

While pursuing a career in carpentry, he continued with his creations, realizing that the inspirations he used to create these pieces of art were something more than just a hobby. He began to research the origins of his biological family and discovered that he was descended from the Cherokee people. Finally having his suspicions proven right about the naturalness of his art, Russ then realized that creating this art was his heritage and his life's calling.

Russ called San Antonio, Texas, home for most of his life. In 2009, he began a journey of traveling the Southwest in a motor home with his wife, Jan, creating and selling art fulltime. On New Year’s Day, 2011, inspired by the magic of the desert and the beautiful Arizona sunsets, they decided to make Cave Creek their “home base”, bit subsequently moved back to Texas

Russ has sold his art to galleries, trading posts, and Native American shops in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Oregon, Utah, Colorado, and New York. In addition, he sells to collectors all over the United States, in Finland, and other European countries.

Russ is also available for private showings, exhibitions, and demonstrations, and teaches flint-knapping and lazy stitch bead working to all ages. He feels that part of his calling is to teach these creative traditions so that they can be passed on to future generations.

John MacLeod – Native American Reproduction Art

John MacLeod's passion for the Old West started as a boy growing up in the Midwest. Young MacLeod grew up in the golden era of TV Westerns watching with cowboy hat on and cap guns strapped to his sides. The best was yet to come when his dad returned from a business trip with a western leather vest as a gift. MacLeod still has that vest today in his Arizona home.

A long time woodworker and carver, MacLeod became involved with the sport of Cowboy Action Shooting in the late 1990s. Admiring other participant's leather gear he tried his hand at making his own belt and holsters. Soon he began creating spur straps, knife sheaths, scabbards, wrist cuffs, chaps, chinks and more; it wasn't long before his shooting friends began asking MacLeod to make leather work for them too.

Encouragement from friends in galleries and mentors such as Chuck "Winterheart" Reddick led MacLeod to turn his considerable talents to the creation of Native American-style pieces with their emphasis on artistry and color. "It gave me a chance to work with different types of leather - such as soft leathers from deer, elk, and buffalo, and beads, horsehair, trade cloths, paints and pigments."

With all hand-sewing, beading and painting, MacLeod now works on his craft from his home studio up to six or seven days per week at times. Using many traditional methods and materials MacLeod now creates one-of-a-kind Native American-inspired artifacts including ceremonial war shirts, shields, shield covers, horse masks, dresses, bags, and many other items. Depending on a piece's complexity, an item can take from two and a half to four weeks to complete.

Cindy Jo Popejoy -- Native American Art

Cindy Jo is part Cherokee and has honored the pride of her heritage through her work as well as her life. She is known Internationally for her artwork. She has been creating Native American style art since childhood and is partial to the life of the warrior who conquers adversity with pride and honor.

Cindy Jo Popejoy -- Native American Art

Cindy Jo not only admires the Indians, but feels we owe them a tremendous debt. They gave us romance, legends, myths, as well as a history. They shaped the character of our entire nation. Their bravery, spirituality and devotion to family, tribe and the Creator are a constant inspiration to her.

She has been said to be the "Rolls Royce" of Native American style artists and anyone who owns a piece of her art, is sure to agree. Black Arrow is proud to display a wonderful collection of dramatic Spirit Statues and Spirit Masks Wall Art that are carefully and artfully created. Each Cindy Jo art piece is entirely original and the demand for Cindy Jo's stunning and beautiful creations only increases with time due to her on-going creativity and her demand for absolute quality. Each piece proudly bares her signature.

Cindy Jo carefully creates each piece totally by hand, from sculpturing the clay, to painting, feathering and traditional beading. She uses the most natural materials, custom creating her own recipe for the clay of Mother Earth. She recreates the powerful and vivid colors of nature, as well as the most elemental materials that Mother Earth has provided for her people for many years. Her lifetime research along with her own unique ideas lead her on to represent, promote, preserve, and protect a time and a people whose heritage fulfills a vast part of the circle of life.

Laura Mountain -- Hand Painted Hides

Laura Mountain -- Hand Painted Hides

Native to Arizona, Laura has always been inspired by her surroundings. Traveling throughout the southwest in search of insight, her artistic expressions are a true reflection of her experiences. Her natural, rustic style and attention to detail are what make her art so unique and appealing.

Mainly self-taught as an artist, Laura has been involved in creative activity for the past 30 years. Beginning with a career in the commercial/graphic arts industry, she has since evolved into fine crafts and painting. She has a Native American Cherokee ancestry, and her love of the natural world and spiritual devotion are echoed in her art.

Laura feels it is important that the materials used are as genuine and natural as possible. Hand crafted arrowheads, shells, feathers, and various trade beads are hand sewn, wrapped, and tied with sinew. Ground earth pigments are mixed with natural bases and oils to produce her paints. She feels that natural resources lend a sense of authenticity to her one-of-a-kind works.

Dennis Gallagher – Bronze

Dennis first became fascinated with the West when he moved to Arizona with his family at the age of nine. The youngest of seven children, he has always been a family man, marrying his high school sweetheart, MaryAnn, and raising two sons.

Dennis Gallagher – Bronze

Although he was always interested in art, he didn’t pursue his dream until he had ended his engineering and sales career in the semiconductor equipment business. After admiring the work of numerous artists, many of whom encouraged him to put his own creative talents to work, he decided to follow his heart and be a part of the growing number of dedicated people who want to preserve the heritage of the West. This desire takes him to various events in the Western United States that promote cowboy poetry, cowboy music, and Western and Native American art.

Although primarily a self-taught artist, Dennis has studied under Mehl Lawson, one of the Cowboy Artists of America, to gain a better understanding of the horse anatomy, and learn first-hand what is expected of a successful Western artist. Dennis has two unique wall-mounted sculptures. The first was “Drinker of the Wind,” a wall-mounted sculpture illustrating one of the early Spanish mustangs brought to the Americas. This sculpture is available with dawn to dusk lighting to set off this beautiful piece even further (edition size of 25). Recently, Dennis completed "Wind Drinkers," for those who love "Drinker of the Wind" but desire a larger version. This sculpture features two horse heads and also is available with dawn to dusk lighting (edition size of 15). “Making Ends Meet” is a pair of horse heads mounted on horseshoe shaped bookends. These are beautifully detailed and would be a wonderful edition to any book lover’s home or office (edition size of 30).

Dennis has sculpted two pieces honoring American cowboys and cowgirls. They are “Cowboy Spoken Here,” a bust of a cowboy, and “Cowboy Sweetheart,” which depicts a cowgirl playing a guitar.

Other sculptures with limited editions still available at this time include “Lean on Me” and “Shortcut to Nowhere.” “Lean on Me” is a bust-type representation of a mare and foal, with the foal resting on the mare’s neck. A poem that was cast as an integral part of the base will most definitely touch anyone who reads it. The edition size for this piece is 25. “Shortcut to Nowhere” is a depiction of a stubborn, worn out cowboy who, despite warnings, decided to take a shortcut to save himself some time. On a rocky ledge, with the wind blowing fiercely at his back, he discovers that he must turn back and find the suggested trail to his destination. The edition size for this piece is 30.

Due to the immediate success of his work, Dennis’ sculptures in bronze have found their way into homes and corporate offices with private collections across America. Exposure at numerous art shows, including the prestigious Phippen Western Art Show, has proven very successful for him. In addition, Dennis’ art was recently featured in a Phoenix area magazine. His versatility, unique approach to composition and presentation, combined with his attention to detail, have made him a collector’s favorite. Becoming a collector of Dennis’ low edition size sculptures offers you a rare, ground floor investment opportunity in a timeless body of art that you will certainly treasure.

VOGT Silversmith – Buckle Sets and Leather Goods

VOGT Silversmith – Buckle Sets and Leather Goods

The Vogt silver shop has been building beautiful, hand-crafted western sterling accessories for over 40 years. Located in Old Mexico, it draws upon the region's 400 years of silversmithing tradition which began with the arrival of Spanish conquistadores and the development of the Mexican vaquero.

Their original methods and knowledge were passed on to early Spanish Californians, the Native Americans of the southwest, and the western silversmiths of the 20th century. From these great teachers many North American artisans learned techniques still practiced today, so they like to say that "four centuries of tradition go into every piece they build. Vogt offers a Lifetime Guarantee with all their products, Should your genuine Vogt product for any reason be broken, bent, twisted, or otherwise damaged, they will fix or replace the piece free of charge (original owners only).

Odell Borg – Native American Style Flutes

Native American Style Flutes, Cedar Flutes, Double Flutes and Triple Flutes -- High Spirits Flutes, Odell Borg's heritage of German and Chippewa Indian is reflected in the design and craftsmanship of his fine musical instruments. Odell makes each flute from a solid piece of the finest cedar (instead of gluing two halves together as is so common) and each flute is precision tuned so that it will blend perfectly with other Red Tail Hawk Native American Flute - with Turquois instruments.

Odell Borg – Native American Style Flutes

Odell Borg has been an artist / craftsman for many years. Being of Chippewa descent, Odell developed a deep respect for the Native American culture and the gifts that they have to share. In the past fifteen years Odell has become an internationally known master flute maker. He has won numerous awards for his work and has been honored by many professional musicians that use his flutes for their performances and recordings as well as having the instruments displayed as sculptures and visual art pieces.

To tell it in Odell's own words: "I received a cedar flute as a gift about eight years ago. Prior to that, I had never played an instrument before, nor was I musically educated. Learning to play was so easy, that I felt that I was gifted. It turns out that most of us are gifted with the ability to play this flute. Having made that discovery I decided to introduce as many people as possible to the cedar flute, sharing the joy and magic it has brought to me. The response and enthusiasm has been wonderful. I am very grateful for the letters and cards I have received from people telling me how this has added to their life. "Creator has been very generous in guiding me to make a great sounding flute that is easy to play. My goal is to make the flute as affordable as possible and still maintain high quality.

If you are drawn to this instrument, trust your feeling on the one you choose. It makes no difference who made the flute just make sure it is easy for you-to play - that's the key. When you completely close all the holes and blow into the flute it should create a sweet, melodic note easily. "I give deep gratitude to the Ancient Ones that have gone before us and left us the gift of the cedar flute."